Getting involved

Why engage in coop­er­ative approaches under Art. 6 of the Paris Agreement?

Consid­ering that trans­ferring countries must adjust their emissions in accor­dance with trans­ferred ITMOs, the benefits of partic­i­pating in coop­er­ative approaches might not be obvious. Yet there are several ways in which a trans­ferring country may benefit:

Co-benefits for the trans­ferring country

In coop­er­ative approaches, miti­gation activ­ities are required to promote sustainable devel­opment. Conse­quently, such activ­ities will be carefully designed to generate co-benefits that go beyond the miti­gation of green­house gases. These may include positive health effects, cost-savings for house­holds, job creation, stimu­lation of new invest­ments, etc.

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Capaci­ty building

Miti­gation activ­ities carried out under coop­er­ative approaches are limited in time. Once the structure to incen­tivise a miti­gation activi­ty has been imple­mented and local staff has been trained, the country may benefit from sustaining the activi­ty with its own resources and capac­ities, thereby contributing to meeting its NDC.

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Access to measures that would otherwise not be available

A country will consider various measures and regu­la­tions to combat green­house gas emissions. Yet some of these, while in principle sensible and effective, may in practice not prove achievable for a variety of reasons.

Given constrained budgets and technical capac­ities, a country will focus on measures involving least cost per miti­gation outcome, and disregard measures that are expensive, techni­cally challenging, or located in remote areas. Such measures could be identified for support under a coop­er­ative approach.

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Trans­for­mation

In ideal cases, over the course of a miti­gation activi­ty carried out under coop­er­ative approaches, framework condi­tions evolve in such a way that no further support is needed after termi­nation of the coop­er­ative approach. Examples include behav­ioural changes, shifts in manu­fac­turing standards, or the emergence of a mature market segment.
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Increase domestic miti­gation

If the volume of effective emission reduc­tions gener­ated by a miti­gation activi­ty is higher than the number of trans­ferred ITMOs, the trans­ferring country registers a net benefit.

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Co-benefits for the trans­ferring country

In coop­er­ative approaches, miti­gation activ­ities are required to promote sustainable devel­opment. Conse­quently, such activ­ities will be carefully designed to generate co-benefits that go beyond the miti­gation of green­house gases. These may include positive health effects, cost-savings for house­holds, job creation, stimu­lation of new invest­ments, etc.

1

Increase domestic miti­gation

If the volume of effective emission reduc­tions gener­ated by a miti­gation activi­ty is higher than the number of trans­ferred ITMOs, the trans­ferring country registers a net benefit.

3

Trans­for­mation

In ideal cases, over the course of a miti­gation activi­ty carried out under coop­er­ative approaches, framework condi­tions evolve in such a way that no further support is needed after termi­nation of the coop­er­ative approach. Examples include behav­ioural changes, shifts in manu­fac­turing standards, or the emergence of a mature market segment.
5

Access to measures that would otherwise not be available

A country will consider various measures and regu­la­tions to combat green­house gas emissions. Yet some of these, while in principle sensible and effective, may in practice not prove achievable for a variety of reasons.

Given constrained budgets and technical capac­ities, a country will focus on measures involving least cost per miti­gation outcome, and disregard measures that are expensive, techni­cally challenging, or located in remote areas. Such measures could be identified for support under a coop­er­ative approach.

2

Capaci­ty building

Miti­gation activ­ities carried out under coop­er­ative approaches are limited in time. Once the structure to incen­tivise a miti­gation activi­ty has been imple­mented and local staff has been trained, the country may benefit from sustaining the activi­ty with its own resources and capac­ities, thereby contributing to meeting its NDC.

4

Co-benefits for the trans­ferring country

In coop­er­ative approaches, miti­gation activ­ities are required to promote sustainable devel­opment. Conse­quently, such activ­ities will be carefully designed to generate co-benefits that go beyond the miti­gation of green­house gases. These may include positive health effects, cost-savings for house­holds, job creation, stimu­lation of new invest­ments, etc.

1

Access to measures that would otherwise not be available

A country will consider various measures and regu­la­tions to combat green­house gas emissions. Yet some of these, while in principle sensible and effective, may in practice not prove achievable for a variety of reasons.

Given constrained budgets and technical capac­ities, a country will focus on measures involving least cost per miti­gation outcome, and disregard measures that are expensive, techni­cally challenging, or located in remote areas. Such measures could be identified for support under a coop­er­ative approach.

2

Increase domestic miti­gation

If the volume of effective emission reduc­tions gener­ated by a miti­gation activi­ty is higher than the number of trans­ferred ITMOs, the trans­ferring country registers a net benefit.

3

Capaci­ty building

Miti­gation activ­ities carried out under coop­er­ative approaches are limited in time. Once the structure to incen­tivise a miti­gation activi­ty has been imple­mented and local staff has been trained, the country may benefit from sustaining the activi­ty with its own resources and capac­ities, thereby contributing to meeting its NDC.

4

Trans­for­mation

In ideal cases, over the course of a miti­gation activi­ty carried out under coop­er­ative approaches, framework condi­tions evolve in such a way that no further support is needed after termi­nation of the coop­er­ative approach. Examples include behav­ioural changes, shifts in manu­fac­turing standards, or the emergence of a mature market segment.
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